OCCK

“Cooper, who was elected in 2008, says members of her staff have responded to all of King’s queries over the years. Her chief assistant, Paul Walton spoke at length with King in 2012. King also met with Gary Miller, then- Oakland County deputy sheriff.” From A Father’s Story by Deborah Holdship published in Michigan Today, April 25, 2016

This statement is at best misleading and at worst incorrect. For instance, one of the Assistant Prosecutors advised me that he had been instructed not to talk to me.

The June 25, 2012 meeting with Walton is summarized in Chapter 64 of my story of my son’s murder, A Father’s Story-OCCK. Prior to this meeting on June 19, Kevin Dietz of Channel 4 sent a FOIA request to Cooper for the documents she had shown him yesterday and received 121 pages concerning the Busch investigation. This was during the same time period that Cooper told both the Oakland County Circuit Court and the Michigan Court of Appeals that this information was exempt and not available to me in my FOIA cases. Walton gave us less than ten pages at the June 25 meeting (Chapter 38). At this same meeting Walton also told us that he had no evidence exonerating Busch from participation in these murders.

Cooper and Walton asked me to come to court on July 20, 2011. When I appeared they falsely told Judge Martha Anderson that I had committed the crime of disclosing the existence of the Oakland County Grand Jury. When I asked him who provided his office with this false information at the June 25, 2012 meeting, he responded Kevin Dietz. Dietz had previously delivered to his office a statement that I was not the source of his TV program announcing the existence of the Oakland County Grand Jury (Chapter 65, Exhibit K).

The meeting with Gary Miller was arranged with Sheriff Michael Bouchard and no prosecutor was present. My summary of the meeting is at Chapter 64, Exhibit J.
Cooper called on March 1, 2010 to tell us that Busch was no longer a suspect. On June 25, 2012 Walton tells us the Oakland County Prosecutor has no evidence exonerating him. The only person who can give us the basis for her March 1 phone call is Cooper. Hopefully before the November 8 election someone in the media will ask her to explain why she called me on March 1 to tell me Busch was no longer a suspect.

Footnote: You can access my Story at “afathersstory-occk.com”. You can locate specific Chapters by adding “/chapter-xx”.

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OCCK

As discussed in Post Script Three the Oakland County Prosecutor reported in February 1977 that Christopher Busch had passed a lie detector test but refused to report later readings from three other polygraphers who ruled otherwise. The inconsistent positions taken by the Oakland County Prosecutor on the publication of polygraph examinations needs clarification. The following is my timeline on the publication results of the lie detector tests of two of the OCCK suspects, Christopher Buach and Vince Gunnels.

January 28, 1977: The OCCK Task Force takes the polygraph examination of Busch in Genesee County. An Oakland County Prosecutor was present because Busch was a suspect in the murder of Mike Stebbins, the first victim (Chapter 22).

February 1977: Oakland County Prosecutor L Brooks Patterson concludes that Busch was not a suspect in the murder of Stebbins, the first victim, because he had passed a lie detector test. This information was published in two newspaper articles which were in the Michigan State Police reports which I received on December 15, 2010. Tim was abducted and killed one month later in March, 1977.

November 13, 2009: After my October 27, 2009 meeting with the Task Force Oakland County Prosecutor Jessica Cooper wrote me a letter advising me that publication of lie detector tests is a crime (Chapter 62, Exhibit J).

December 15, 2010: This is the date I received the Michigan State Police reports on Busch. It was after this date that I read two newspaper articles stating that Busch was not involved in the Stebbins case because he passed a lie detector test.

November 20. 2012: In response to my third FOIA request Oakland County Assistant Prosecutor Thomas Grden delivered to me a copy of the complete polygraph test of Vince Gunnels taken on July 30, 2009 including the questions, the answers and the conclusions (Chapter 42). This information had been redacted in the MSP reports I received on December 15, 2010. Has Jessica Cooper taken any action to charge or discipline Gredn for this statutory violation?

April 1, 2013: Almost two years after I filed suit to review the October 28, 2008 search warrant on the Busch residence the 48th District Court gave me access to its search warrant file. The search warrant affidavit prepared by the Oakland County Prosecutor and signed by the Michigan State Police discloses that three experienced polygraphers concluded that Busch either failed or did not pass the January 28, 1977 lie detector test (Chapter 8, Exhibit A). The Oakland County Prosecutor publicly states in February 1977 that Busch passed the test and then refuses to give me access to the contrary readings. What is good for the goose is good for the gander! No prosecutor should have authority to state the earlier results and then deny victims or suspects access to the contrary answers.

October 2013: The police reports delivered to me at this time stated that more than 300 suspects had passed polygraph tests until Ted Lamborgine failed his test in 2005. Was a polygraph test the sole basis used to locate Tim’s killer? Has any prosecutor ever been accused of a crime when the statute is violated? Should Cooper and/or Grden be charged now?

If the courts do not clarify this problem the legislature should confer with the prosecutors and the criminal bar association to clarify procedures after anyone publishes lie detector results.

Footnote: You can access my Story at “afathersstory-occk.com”. You can locate specific Chapters by adding “/chapter-x”).

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OCCK

No public body should have the right to publish favorable news and then assert the exemption provisions of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) when contrary results arise. We may see examples of this between now and the November 8 elections. In 1977 the Oakland County Prosecutor publicly announced that Christopher Busch did not kill Mike Stebbins, the first victim, because he passed a lie detector test. In 2008 the Oakland County Prosecutor refused to release the conclusions of three subsequent polygraphers who arrived at contrary opinions after reading the same test results.

The King family requests the Michigan legislature to amend FOIA to eliminate her dictatorial decision to deny the family of Tim King any explanation of why she eliminated Christopher Busch as a suspect (Chapter 35). FOIA places both the burden of proof and the burden of going forward on the public body and not on the citizen plaintiff (Chapter 16). In my two FOIA cases both the Oakland County Circuit Court and the Michigan Court of Appeals have upheld the position of Cooper that victims in this 40 year old OCCK case are not entitled to any information on why she called me on March 1, 2010 to tell me Christopher Busch was no longer a suspect (Chapter 35). The victims, the judges and the public do not know if the Busch case was closed for professional, publicity, power and control, political or some other reason.

Many times a prosecutor will tell the public why a suspicious criminal cannot or will not be charged. Jessica Cooper has made these announcements. For instance Cooper publicly announced that she would not charge the Northland Mall officers who killed a customer because that was not their intent, a professional reason. When he was prosecutor l. Brooks Patterson made disclosures in February 1977 for not charging Busch (Chapter 41). Patterson gave a professional reason to support his conclusion. Cooper, who has not prepared or tried a case for almost four decades, has not given any reason for advising me on March 1, 2010 that Busch was no longer a suspect. FOIA does not and should not grant prosecutors dictatorial discretion in the publication of these conclusions. The prosecutor should explain the reason for this decision, especially when the police have contrary opinions.

If a prosecutor decides not to charge any suspect for a nonprofessional reason the victim currently has no remedy. For instance, if the suspect is related to the prosecutor or is a major political donor is silence proper? In Tim’s case was Oakland County upset that Wayne County may have identified the murderers (Chapter 56)? If publication shortly before an election could affect the election result a prosecutor should not have discretion to talk to the media while at the same time asserting she is under no obligation to give the same information to the victims or the judiciary (Chapters 38 to 40). This paragraph could continue for several more pages with questions and examples all of which discuss my conclusion that prosecutors should open the entire file when they tell anyone of their decision not to charge a suspect. The FOIA statute should clarify this issue!

Footnte: You can access my Story at “afathersstory-occk.com” You can locate specific Chapters by adding “/Chapter-xx “. Another source is “afathersstory-occk.wordpress”.

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OCCK

Christopher Busch was involved in the murder of my son Tim. “Tell ‘em what you gonna to tell ‘em, tell ‘em and then tell ‘em what you told ‘em” (Chapter 2). This is a short summary of what I have told you in the previous Chapters 66 to 71.

Once Busch died he could not be tried or convicted. The facts presented to me do not contain information exonerating him. After his death both Oakland County and the original Task Force essentially closed the door on the OCCK murders for almost 30 years. Presumably, they could then reopen the case if any other suspect was identified.

Four of the major factors supporting my conclusion are the non-evidentiary facts set forth in Chapter 67. After the Task Force was revitalized in 2005 Richard Thompson, the Oakland County Prosecutor responsible for the case from the beginning, told the Michigan State Police Busch was guilty. Four unrelated persons advised the King family the murderer was the son of a GM or automobile executive. On October 19, 2009, the Task Force told the family of Kristine Mihelich that Busch and his companions were the leading suspects. After Jessica Cooper became the Oakland County Prosecutor on January 1, 2009, she told the Michigan State Police not to provide her with OCCK information. Why did she do this unless she had been advised that the case was closed?

Chapters 68 to 70 set forth 24 questions to the Oakland County Prosecutor. The King family has additional areas of discussion if Cooper would only take time to meet with us. There can be a number of reasons why a prosecutor chooses not to charge a suspect. If the reasons are professional it is common to explain this to the public. How often have you read that two mutual deaths were the result of a murder-suicide? Cooper advised the media that she would not charge the Northland Mall representatives who killed a customer because they had no intent to kill him, a professional conclusion. Without an adequate explanation the King family cannot eliminate the possibility the reasons are personal (Busch’s father was a friend of the prosecutor?), political (the Busch family was a major contributor to the election campaigns?), previous mistakes (Busch was allowed to plead guilty in his four pedophile cases rather than trying him?), power and control (we cannot allow Wayne County to solve the case?) or other alternatives.

Three years ago Cooper referred to me as an 82 year old senile attorney. Her conclusion is interesting because she has never talked with me. If you agree with her I apologize for taking up your time. If you decide her judgment on my senility is incorrect or her failure to answer the questions from the King family is improper, please vote for her opponent Mike Goetz this November.

There will be post scripts to this Story but this is the final Chapter on my analysis of the investigation into Tim’s murder. One footnote will request the legislature to include new laws to require victim information in future cases.

Thank you for your patience if you have read all or any of my 73 Chapters.

Barry King.

Footnote: You can access this Story at “afathersstory.occk.com”. You can locate specific Chapters by adding “/chapter-xx”. Another source is “afathersstory-OCCK.wordpress”.

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OCCK

Chapter 72: Interim Comments: Three

This unplanned Chapter was prompted by the attached article from the September 2, 2016 article in The Wall Street Journal (Exhibit L). This article supported my concerns that Oakland County and the Task Force may have used scientific evidence discovered in 2009 or 2010 through the efforts of the office of the Wayne County Prosecutor (Chapters 32and 56) to improperly terminate the circumstantial and scientific evidence involving Christopher Busch and perhaps others.

The victims of the OCCK killers died in 1976 and 1977 before the discovery of DNA evidence. The original Task Force did not have DNA scientific evidence available for its investigation. Arch Sloan was the third tip given to the Task Force and Busch and Gregory Greene were the tips 369 and 370. After Busch and Greene passed their polygraph tests in January 1977 there was no further investigation until my daughter Cathy called the Livonia Police Department in July 2007 (Chapter 19). I received no information on the Sloan investigation until July 17, 2011 when Jessica Cooper requested information from the public on his possible involvement (Chapter 64). Since then all of the updates to the King family have been provided by Chief Assistant Wayne County Prosecutor Rob Moran and Wayne County Detective Cory Williams.

Why did Cooper call me on March 1, 2010 to tell me Busch was no longer a suspect? My degree in bar room psychology has led me to believe that the Task Force and Cooper decided the mDNA match between two of the victims and a hair found in the Sloan car was a better lead than the scientific and circumstantial evidence in the Busch case. The King family also believes Sloan was a good lead and should be examined (Chapter 32). We have been advised that this Sloan lead has not located any additional evidence regarding his possible involvement.

When the Task Force and Oakland County could not locate any further evidence on the Sloan case, at the request of the Oakland County Sheriff Cooper publicly requested information on this lead. OAKLAND COUNTY HAS MADE NO SIMILAR INFORMATION REQUEST FOR PUBLIC INFORMATION ON THE BUSCH OR OTHER LEADS. Oakland County closed its pending investigation of Busch and all other individuals sometime between the Task Force meeting on October 27, 2009 and the meeting with the investigators on February 26, 2010. Are any of the criticisms on scientific evidence in Exhibit L applicable to the Sloan lead? For two centuries before Tim was abducted criminals in this country were convicted without DNA evidence. That law has not changed to my knowledge.

When was the Sloan case mDNA evidence available? Did Paul Walton discuss the Sloan involvement with the investigators at the February 26, 2010 meeting? Why is mDNA evidence applicable in the Sloan case and the cold case conviction of a defendant charged by the Oakland County Grand Jury (Chapter 55) but not admissible regarding Kristine Michelich, the third victim (Chapter 34)? Should the Oakland County Prosecutor have dictatorial authority to omit or charge suspects without explanation or supervision? Do my concerns that the emphasis on the Sloan case was an attempt at diversion from other suspects have any validity?

Please click below for the September 2, 2016 article in The Wall Street Journal.

Exhibit L

Footnote: You can access this Story at “afathersstory-occk.com” You can access specific Chapters by adding “/Chapter-XX”.

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OCCK

This Chapter discusses some of my concerns not related to the dictatorial responses of the Oakland County Prosecutor. These concerns entered into my conclusion that Christopher Busch was involved in Tim’s death.

Criminal suspects are normally identified by name when the police receive the initial lead. In this case no name was given when my daughter, Cathy, called the Livonia Police Department in July 2007 (Chapter 19, Exhibit E). From her information, the police identified Busch. When Jessica Cooper advised me on March 1, 2010 that Busch was not a suspect the King family had not been provided any documents. I received my first information on December 15, 2010 when the Michigan State Police delivered 3411 pages pursuant to my FOIA law suit. All the information I have received arrived after that date. Oakland County has not provided any information to my family.

For more than 30 years I had concluded that it was a diabolically clever individual who killed Tim. I always thought if two or more individuals were involved one of them would ultimately identify the killers, either directly or indirectly. In 2006 Lawrence Wasser indirectly identified Busch to Patrick Coffey, a former neighbor and classmate of my son Chris, at a national convention of polygraphers in Las Vegas (Chapters 19 to 21). At his own expense Coffey flew from California and gave sworn testimony to the Wayne County Circuit Court. To my knowledge no one has taken any sworn testimony from Wasser. Apparently some authorities believe is more important to keep the polygraph results secret than it is to solve the OCCK case or any other serious crime.

The relationship between Busch and Greene with the OCCK case was first discussed in a January 1977 pedophile case in Genesee County. They were codefendants for abusing a boy in the Flint area (Chapter 29). Greene advised the investigators that Busch had killed Mark Stebbins, the first victim of the OCCK. NO ONE FOLLOWED UP ON THIS LEAD! They abused the same child. Greene received a life sentence. Busch was placed on probation even though he pleaded guilty in this and three other cases. Which one of them was the son of a prominent GM or automobile executive (Chapter 45)?

In February 1977 the Oakland County Prosecutor announced that Busch was not involved in the Stebbins murder because he passed a polygraph test. Tim was abducted and murdered in March. If Busch was ultimately charged in the OCCK case this timing would be very embarrassing. The possibility that Busch killed Tim while on probation also led me to continue my search for the truth.

Busch died on or about November 20, 1978 and the original Task Force was disbanded on December 15, 1978. Coincidence? The death was treated as a suicide but there is some concern he may have been murdered (Chapter 24, Exhibit F). Even though Busch had been removed as a suspect in February 1977, the Bloomfield Township police called the OCCK Task Force shortly after arriving at the residence to investigate his death. To my knowledge no one has interviewed the Task Force members, John Davis and Ron Pierce, who came to the residence. Why were they called and who did they report to?

Another interesting fact arose from the FBI interview with Charles Busch, the brother of Christopher. Before making any statement Charles asked if his nephews could be placed in a witness protection program (Chapter 28). This would only be necessary if there is someone alive who could harm them. I have requested the Task Force to follow up on this item.

Not all of the investigators have eliminated Busch as a suspect. In June 2015 one of them called to make certain I had received all of the Busch files (Chapter 25). When the MSP requested a search warrant of the former Busch residence October 28, 2008 the Wayne County Prosecutor, the Oakland County Prosecutor and the Michigan State Police all thought this was the best lead in the OCCK case. After Jessica Cooper called me on March 1, 2010 to tell me Busch was no longer a suspect her Chief Assistant Paul Walton told us they had no information exonerating him (Chapter 65).

As I mentioned early in this Story the emphasis on the blue Gremlin was entirely incorrect (Chapters 3 to7). The documents the Oakland County Prosecutor delivered to me on November 20, 2012 mention several other cars. A Pontiac is associated with all four children, and a Pontiac Lemans with three of them. The failure to publicize the possible involvement of the other cars is disturbing to the King family. Was this a deliberate attempt to mislead the public? Did the death of Busch eliminate the need for further evidence to close the case?

The King family concerns over the silence of Oakland County is summarized in Chapter 58. We greatly fear the silence is a deliberate attempt by Oakland County to avoid criticism of the improper actions in 1977 which would have involved the Busch family and perhaps other prominent citizens.

Any comments on the validity of these conclusions will be appreciated.

Footnote: You can access this Story at “afathersstory-occk.com” You can access specific Chapters by adding “/Chapter-XX”.

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OCCK

Over the 30 year period from 1977 to 2007, it was customary for the local television stations to review the Oakland County Child Killer case every five years. In late 2006, my children, Cathy and Chris, expressed an interest in joining in the 2007 programs. I advised them that I had no objection but that I would advise the revitalized Task Force of their intentions.

In late 2006, I called Michigan State Police Sergeant Garry Gray and advised him of this suggestion. In his response, Gray indicated he would like to meet with me concerning a new development in this case. I advised him that I could come in any afternoon next week. Twenty minutes later he called and asked if I could come in immediately and I met with him at the Oak Park station. During the conference we made arrangements to meet with my family and the Task Force the next week. I then visited the Oak Park Station with my son Chris and our friend Don Studt, now the Chief of Police in Birmingham. The Task Force was represented by Gray, his assistant Officer Robertson and Cory Williams, the Livonia Police Officer working with Gray regarding pedophile rings on Cass Avenue and in the Wayne and Oakland County. They advised me that the Task Force was following a lead on Ted Lamborgine, a long time participant in the Detroit Cass Avenue and the Oakland County child pedophile cases. The Task Force believed that Lamborgine was a possible lead to the identity of the Oakland County Child Killer.

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OCCK

Tim’s mother died in 2004 and I married her friend, Janice Bollinger in 2008. Janice told me that her friend, Doug Wilson, was hypnotized by the Task Force. After a lengthy search, she located him and he is now employed by a Japanese automobile company in La Jolla, California.

When I contacted Wilson, he told me an interesting story. Wilson had visited the Hunter-Maple parking lot the night of the abduction and recalled seeing Tim. After some encouragement from his wife and friends, Wilson agreed in June 1977 to be hypnotized and tell the FBI what he had seen.

He recalled seeing Tim on a skateboard in the parking lot and even identified the place in the wall where his skateboard had hit the building. The Task Force located some orange markings at the spot he identified.

Wilson also identified two gentlemen. One was a young man who was running back and forth with no apparent goal. The other was an older gentleman in a Pontiac Lemans which drew his suspicions. Wilson even tried to remember the license plate on the Lemans but could only remember the digits 222.

Wilson then wrote me a letter which concluded as follows:

“When the session ended I had thought maybe only 15-20 minutes had elapsed, but when I looked at my watch I was shocked to see that 4 hours had passed. The agents were very excited about my observations. I was able to confirm the possibility that two men were involved. This was information that the FBI had only speculated on. From my description the sketch artist was able to get a pretty good likeness of each man. But, the most important information was my identification of the car that the older man was sitting in. It was a 1973 Pontiac Le Mans 2/door coupe.

It turns out that they already knew the make of the car. When the previous victim had been dropped off, the car had backed into a snow bank and left a perfect impression of the car’s rear bumper. As for the car’s license number, I could only remember the last three numbers: the three 2’s. For some reason the phrase I had made to remember the preceding 3 letters was not retrievable. To this day I still cannot remember it. I can only surmise that numbers are stored in a different part of the brain than the phrase would be.”

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OCCK

Prologue

My eleven-year-old son, Timothy, was abducted in Oakland County on March 16, 1977, and his body was found in Wayne County in a roadside ditch on March 22, 1977. In response to my Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) lawsuit against the Michigan State Police, I learned after December 15, 2010 that Tim had been sexually abused. Furthermore, Tim had been suffocated by someone who held both his nose and mouth shut. Tim died in his hands. I cannot imagine a more heinous death.

After the death of Kristine Michelich, the third victim, my children recall a discussion I had with Tim. He was told not to accept a ride from a stranger. If anyone tried to force him to enter a car, he was instructed to drop anything he was carrying, run and scream. During the six days he was alive, I am certain he knew what would happen.

In July 2007, Tim’s sister, Cathy Broad, advised the Livonia Police Department in Wayne County of an unidentified suspect. Detective Cory Williams of the Livonia Police Department, and Detective Sergeant Garry Gray of the Michigan State Police, identified this suspect as Christopher Busch on November 30, 2007. Williams and Gray later identified the possible participation of two of Busch’s companions, Gregory Greene and Vince Gunnels. Thereafter the King family received encouraging reports on the Busch involvement from law enforcement. To my surprise, my friend, Donald Studt, now Birmingham Chief of Police, called me on March 1, 2010 at the request of Jessica Cooper, the Oakland County Prosecutor, to advise me that Christopher Busch and his companions were no longer suspects. When no one would tell me the basis for this conclusion, I commenced FOIA lawsuits against both the Michigan State Police and the Oakland County Prosecutor. Jessica Cooper and her staff have refused to talk to me about the March 1, 2010 conclusions. Thus far her silence has been supported by the Oakland County Circuit Court and the Michigan Court of Appeals.

The King family and the families of Mark Stebbins, Jill Robinson and Kristine Mihelich, the other three OCCK victims, deserve an explanation from the responsible public officials regarding the investigation of these murders. In particular, your local prosecutor should not have dictatorial powers to close investigation of valid suspects without explanation. The Michigan Constitution states that crime victims have a right to confer with the prosecutor (Article I, Section 24). Why should anyone submit a valid suspect to law enforcement if the local prosecutor can refuse to take action for undisclosed reasons? If the reasons are professional, even Jessica Cooper has gone public to explain her reasoning. However, if the reasons are political, personal, power in control or other nonprofessional reasons, all of which may be present in the OCCK case, silence does not protect the victims or the public. I welcome your thoughts and responses but request that you complete the entire story before making interim replies.

In 2008, both Wayne and Oakland County identified Christopher Busch as the best suspect the system had produced in over 30 years. The Christopher Busch lead was the result of the phone call my daughter made to the Livonia Police Department in 2009 with information on an unidentified suspect. Cory Williams of the Livonia Police Department and Gregory Greene of the Michigan State Police identified this suspect as Christopher Busch.

My Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit against the Michigan State Police resulted in the delivery of 3,411 pages on the Christopher Busch investigation. However, the legal system has told me that the Oakland County Prosecutor has no responsibility to provide information supporting her March 1, 2010 phone call.

Last summer I decided to use social media to tell my story. This was awkward because of my limited knowledge of this new communication system. I would like to thank those youngsters (age 60 and under) for the education provided to me regarding this publication.

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