OCCK

This and the following chapters will discuss the history of the Busch investigation before the March 1, 2010 phone call removing him as a suspect.

During 2009 the King Family attempted to obtain information from Oakland County concerning the status of the Christopher Busch investigation. In June my daughter, Cathy called the Victims’ Rights Office of the Oakland County Prosecutor and received no reply. On June 24, 2009 I wrote the Oakland County Prosecutor requesting an update on the investigation. We received no reply to either inquiry.

Several times in 2009, my son Chris and I asked for a meeting with the revitalized Task Force without a favorable reply. I finally set a deadline date of September 30 and called Michigan State Police Sergeant Garry Gray on that date. He returned my voicemail and we agreed on a meeting date of October 7, 2009. On October 6 Gray’s superior officer, Captain Harold Love, called me to adjourn the date for one week to October 14. During the interim week he called me to advise that there would be no meeting on October 14 with no suggestion of an adjourned date.

On or about October 20, I received a phone call from Erica McAvoy who identified herself as the sister of Kristen Mihelich, the third victim. McAvoy advised me that she had received a phone call from her Mother on Friday, October 16, suggesting that they visit with the Michigan State Police on the status of the investigation. Gray agreed to meet with them on Monday, October 19 and showed them books on the three major suspects; Christopher Busch, Vince Gunnels and Gregory Greene.

After October 20, I received a phone call from the Michigan State Police indicating that the Task Force would meet with the King family on Tuesday, October 27. In view of the comments from McAvoy, my son Chris and I looked forward with confidence that we would receive similar information to that given to the Michelich family.

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OCCK

In 2015 I received a phone call from a police officer who was convinced that Christopher Busch was involved in the Oakland County Child Killings. We talked for over an hour. A summary of this telephone discussion is in my files but I do not wish to disclose most the information at this time. Because the officer is still on active duty, no identification was given to me. I did not ask for his name or current position. The officer was convinced that Busch was involved in these murders and wanted to be certain that I have received all of the information regarding his suicide report.

This phone call is another example of the difference of opinion among many of the foot soldiers and their superiors in the police force as well as other political personnel.

If I disagreed with the conclusions of a young lawyer in my office, we would discuss the differences of opinion. While the final decision would be mine, it is improper to ignore other opinions. Does the police administration follow the same procedure? If the Chief of Police disagrees, does he throw the file in waste basket or sit down with the investigating officers to explain why this action is being taken. Similarly, if the police authorities submit a case to the prosecutor, does the prosecutor follow a similar procedure regarding the waste basket or education?

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OCCK

When Christopher Busch was identified as a possible suspect in November of 2007, the only members of his immediate family then surviving were a brother, Charles, and two nephews, Brent Busch and Scott Busch. As previously noted in the Search Warrant Affidavit, Christopher Busch had pedophile sexual experiences with both of his nephews. In 1977 or 1978, Brent Busch asked his uncle where Tim King was abducted and Christopher Busch drove him immediately to the site and showed him the location. Brent Busch advised the investigators that you do not forget things like that.

Charles Busch was originally reluctant to talk to the investigators. However, he finally agreed to meet with the FBI. Before beginning the interview Charles Busch requested that the FBI to place both of his nephews into “witness protection program” if his statement led to further investigative action. To my knowledge no one has asked him for an explanation why he made this request.

Charles Busch also told the FBI that his brother was arrested in Birmingham for sexual activity with a young boy he met through the Big Brother program. This is the only information I have on this crime.

Richard Lawson, a convicted murderer and pedophile activist in the Detroit Cass Avenue Corridor, wrote me a letter and asked for a meeting to discuss the OCCK case. I had met Lawson previously and had little respect for him. Dave Binkley of my law firm agreed to visit with him. Binkley was under instructions not to talk to him about anything other than the Christopher Busch involvement. Lawson advised Binkley that his associate Bobby Moore, used to take young boys to visit with H. Lee Busch, the father of Christopher Busch. Lawson has subsequently died and I am not aware as to whether or not the Task Force followed up on this information.

IF CHARLES BUSCH FEARED THAT SOME HARM MIGHT COME TO HIS NEPHEWS, THIS HARM WOULD COME FROM SOMEONE WHO WAS STILL ALIVE. SHOULD THE TASK FORCE ASK CHARLES BUSCH TO CLARIFY THIS REQUEST?

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OCCK

As Cathy Broad reported in her Letter to the Editor, Chapter 21, the initial unidentified suspect resulted from a discussion between Patrick Coffey and Lawrence Wasser at a national polygraph conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The lead was the result of the request by Jane Burgess, the attorney for the unidentified suspect, to conduct a polygraph examination. I had no experience in polygraph law and I did not have any understanding why a defense attorney would ask for a polygraph examination if the results were not admissible in court.

Two of my lawyer friends advised me that in negotiating certain plea agreements, the prosecutor would require that the defendant pass a polygraph examination. To be certain that the defendant could pass, the defense attorney first arranges an appointment with a polygrapher to determine the result. If the defendant does not pass, they do not accept this plea agreement. If the defendant does pass the plea agreement is accepted.
It is my understanding that the unidentified suspect advised Wasser that he has passed a polygraph test for the OCCK case. Wasser did not complete the scheduled polygraph examination.

Later in this Story I will discuss two pedophile cases in which Busch received probation when the pretrial documents indicate probation would not be allowed.

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OCCK

Prologue

My eleven-year-old son, Timothy, was abducted in Oakland County on March 16, 1977, and his body was found in Wayne County in a roadside ditch on March 22, 1977. In response to my Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) lawsuit against the Michigan State Police, I learned after December 15, 2010 that Tim had been sexually abused. Furthermore, Tim had been suffocated by someone who held both his nose and mouth shut. Tim died in his hands. I cannot imagine a more heinous death.

After the death of Kristine Michelich, the third victim, my children recall a discussion I had with Tim. He was told not to accept a ride from a stranger. If anyone tried to force him to enter a car, he was instructed to drop anything he was carrying, run and scream. During the six days he was alive, I am certain he knew what would happen.

In July 2007, Tim’s sister, Cathy Broad, advised the Livonia Police Department in Wayne County of an unidentified suspect. Detective Cory Williams of the Livonia Police Department, and Detective Sergeant Garry Gray of the Michigan State Police, identified this suspect as Christopher Busch on November 30, 2007. Williams and Gray later identified the possible participation of two of Busch’s companions, Gregory Greene and Vince Gunnels. Thereafter the King family received encouraging reports on the Busch involvement from law enforcement. To my surprise, my friend, Donald Studt, now Birmingham Chief of Police, called me on March 1, 2010 at the request of Jessica Cooper, the Oakland County Prosecutor, to advise me that Christopher Busch and his companions were no longer suspects. When no one would tell me the basis for this conclusion, I commenced FOIA lawsuits against both the Michigan State Police and the Oakland County Prosecutor. Jessica Cooper and her staff have refused to talk to me about the March 1, 2010 conclusions. Thus far her silence has been supported by the Oakland County Circuit Court and the Michigan Court of Appeals.

The King family and the families of Mark Stebbins, Jill Robinson and Kristine Mihelich, the other three OCCK victims, deserve an explanation from the responsible public officials regarding the investigation of these murders. In particular, your local prosecutor should not have dictatorial powers to close investigation of valid suspects without explanation. The Michigan Constitution states that crime victims have a right to confer with the prosecutor (Article I, Section 24). Why should anyone submit a valid suspect to law enforcement if the local prosecutor can refuse to take action for undisclosed reasons? If the reasons are professional, even Jessica Cooper has gone public to explain her reasoning. However, if the reasons are political, personal, power in control or other nonprofessional reasons, all of which may be present in the OCCK case, silence does not protect the victims or the public. I welcome your thoughts and responses but request that you complete the entire story before making interim replies.

In 2008, both Wayne and Oakland County identified Christopher Busch as the best suspect the system had produced in over 30 years. The Christopher Busch lead was the result of the phone call my daughter made to the Livonia Police Department in 2009 with information on an unidentified suspect. Cory Williams of the Livonia Police Department and Gregory Greene of the Michigan State Police identified this suspect as Christopher Busch.

My Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit against the Michigan State Police resulted in the delivery of 3,411 pages on the Christopher Busch investigation. However, the legal system has told me that the Oakland County Prosecutor has no responsibility to provide information supporting her March 1, 2010 phone call.

Last summer I decided to use social media to tell my story. This was awkward because of my limited knowledge of this new communication system. I would like to thank those youngsters (age 60 and under) for the education provided to me regarding this publication.

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