OCCK

There are a number of innocuous items which have affected my judgment on the involvement of Christopher Busch in the OCCK murders. Among them are a series of unrelated facts which I will discuss before reviewing my other conclusions. These four items include (a) the statement of Richard Thompson that Busch was the leading suspect, (b) the four reports that the guilty party was the son of an automobile or GM executive, (c) the Task Force identification of Busch and his companions to the family of Kristine Michelich on October 19, 2009 and (d) the October 5, 2009 report that Jessica Cooper did not want to be kept current of this case.

The report that Richard Thompson thought Busch was the leading suspect demands clarification (Chapter 49). Thompson was the Chief Assistant Oakland County Prosecutor in 1977 who attended the Busch examination in Flint on January 28, 1977 and was later elected Prosecutor. Perhaps no one has better knowledge of this case.

Christopher Busch was the son of H. Lee Busch, a General Motors Vice President. Reports from four unrelated persons stated that the suspect in the OCCK case was the son of a prominent automobile or GM executive are not coincidental (Chapter 45). Based on the documents I have reviewed no one has talked to these individuals. If four people contacted the King family or the media did other persons provide similar information to law enforcement? If anyone else has received similar information, please bring it to my attention.

On October 19, 2009 MSP Sergeant Gary Gray, the leader of the revitalized Task Force, advised the family of Kristine Michelich that Busch and his companions were the leading suspects. On October 27, 2009 the Task Force did not answer any of the questions from the King family. See Chapters 33 to 35. Why couldn’t the Task Force tell the King family the same information it gave to the Michelich family eight days previously? Shortly thereafter Gray was replaced as the Task Force leader and Oakland County took control of the case.

At her first meeting with the Task Force on February 20, 2009 Jessica Cooper advised the investigating officers they could count on the full support of her office (Chapter 53). You can imagine my surprise when I later learned that as of October 5, 2009 Cooper did not want to be kept advised of the OCCK case (Chapter 53). What happened between these two dates to cause Cooper to change her mind?

Is the King family entitled to ask someone to explain the accuracy and the applicability of these observations?

Footnote: you can access this blog at “afathersstory-occk.com’. You can access specific Chapters by adding “/chapter-xx”.

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