OCCK

The search warrant affidavit (Chapter 8 Exhibit A) prepared by the Oakland County Prosecutor contains two subsections discussing the Christopher Busch polygraph history. They provide as follows:

(3) V. “Affidavit has obtained and reviewed a polygraph report prepared by Ralph E Cabot, who at that time was a Michigan State Trooper and a member of the Polygraph Unit at the Flint Post. Cabot reported that he conducted a polygraph test of Christopher Busch on February 15, 1977. During the pre-test interview, Busch admitted that he was sexually attracted to young boys. He denied that he had anything to do with the Stebbins kidnapping and murder. Cabot tested Bush and concluded that he was being truthful. Based on these polygraph test results, Busch was not investigated further as a suspect in the Oakland County child murders.

Y. Affidavit further states that the polygraph charts from Christopher Bush’s polygraph test administrated by Ralph Cabot were recently reviewed by three polygraph examiners, Lt. Robert Dykatra of the Michigan State Police, Tim Larion of the Livonia Police Department and former State Police polygraph examiner John Wojnaroski. Affidavit was told by three examiners that the polygraph charts do not indicate truthfulness, and that at best, the result should have been deemed inconclusive. “

This information was made available to me on April 1, 2013 when the 48th district court granted me access to the search warrant file. Three experienced polygraphers believed Busch did not pass the January 27, 1977 polygraph test, while the conclusion of the initial polygrapher to the contrary was published and apparently relied upon by law enforcement for over 35 years.

The timing of the original conclusion that Busch has passed a polygraph test is particularly disturbing to the King family. This polygraph was taken on January 27, 1977, and Tim was abducted on March 16, 1977. If Busch had not passed the January 27 polygraph examination, he may not have been granted bail as a murder suspect. Furthermore, as noted in Chapter 29 the codefendant in Genesee County, Gregory Greene, more than once told the investigating officers that Busch had killed Mark Stebbins.

Is it possible the elimination of Busch and is companions as suspects on March 1, 2010 was an effort by Jessica Cooper to protect those officials who relied on a polygraph test to terminate further investigation on this portion of the case? The Oakland County Prosecutor concluded in 1977 that Busch was not involved because he passed a polygraph test. Are the victims and the public entitled to similar information when three other polygraphers disagree with this conclusion?

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